Testimony of the Honorable Dennis C. Shea, Chairman, U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, before the House Space, Science, and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Space on September 27, 2016.
Highlights of this Month’s Edition: • Bilateral trade: U.S. deficit with China widens in August 2016 on higher imports, but cumulative deficit down year-to-date. • Bilateral policy issues: Under China’s presidency, leaders at the G20 Summit in Hangzhou pledged to strengthen macroeconomic policy coordination to maintain global growth, but failed to issue concrete proposals; the USTR is challenging China’s excessive government support for rice, corn, and wheat production at the WTO. • Policy trends in China’s economy: The decreasing efficiency of new credit, the speed with which China is accumulating debt, and the rise of nonperforming loans are contributing to China’s vulnerability to a banking crisis; McDonald’s and Yum! Brands to sell rights to operate in China as U.S. fast food restaurants face stagnant growth in China. • Sector focus – Rice, Corn, and Wheat: Chinese support for domestic farmers creates world’s largest stockpile of grain and may cost U.S. wheat farmers $650 million annually; U.S. rice farmers gain access to Chinese market for the first time; U.S. corn exports declined 91 percent from 2012 to 2015 as China blocked shipments of U.S. corn in 2014 and started diversifying its corn imports.
Highlights of this Month’s Edition: • Bilateral trade: The U.S. goods deficit with China continued to slow in July as growth in U.S. imports from China declined. • Bilateral policy issues: China hopes the G20 meeting focuses on maintaining economic growth and mobilizing funding for climate change and environmentally friendly growth. • Policy trends in China’s economy: The IMF warns of China’s rising debt levels in a new report; State Council approves plans for a Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect; China launches a $30 billion government-backed venture capital fund for industrial technology and pilots a limited program to allow SOE employees to own stocks. • Sector focus – Chinese distant water fishing: China’s distant water fishing fleet propped up by government subsidies that encourage excess capacity and overfishing, harming biodiversity.
Highlights of this Month’s Edition: • Bilateral trade: Weaker imports cause the U.S. goods deficit with China to fall 5.7 percent year-on-year in the first half of 2016; U.S. service exports to China reach record high, buoyed by high Chinese tourism spending in the United States. • Bilateral policy issues: The United States and the EU fault China for lack of transparency at the WTO and cite concerns over delayed Chinese economic reform; the United States argues against granting China automatic market economy status in December; USTR is challenging China’s raw materials export restrictions at the WTO. • Quarterly review of China’s economy: In the second quarter of 2016, GDP growth held steady from the previous quarter at 6.7 percent as Beijing again turned to stimulus measures to boost the economy. • Policy trends in China’s economy: Chinese government approves debt-for-equity swap trials despite reservations from major banks; news portals shut down for violating China’s original news reporting prohibition. • Sector focus – Market barriers to U.S. drugs, medical devices, and medical services: China’s aging population drives expansion in the health industry, but numerous market barriers limit access for U.S. firms.
A U.S.-China Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT) is unique among other existing BITs insofar as it will have to balance the interests of two world powers that are both capital-importing and capital-exporting nations. It will not only determine future investment relations between the world’s two biggest economies, but will also set the precedent for U.S. investment relations with other major developing countries. While a U.S.-China BIT could potentially unlock sizable benefits, a number of significant challenges—many of which are unique to China’s involvement—complicate the debates around a prospective U.S.-China BIT. This report briefly summarizes each country’s history with BITs, identifies potential challenges in moving forward with negotiations, and highlights potential implications of the U.S.-China BIT for the United States. Drawing on the 2012 U.S. Model BIT, the evolution of China’s BIT practice, and China’s 2012 BIT with Canada, this report concludes by discussing a number of questions U.S. policymakers should consider.
The report provides an assessment of China’s state plans for civilian and defense-related science and technology, industrial, and energy development and their economic and security implications for the United States. The authors are Tai Ming Cheung, Thomas Mahnken, Deborah Seligsohn, Kevin Pollpeter, Eric Anderson, and Fan Yang, writing for the University of California Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation.



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